It has become a habit, the Australian likes to take the head of the world's number one. All the reasons are good and the scratching hair of the ATP circuit never goes idle. Exaggerated for some, deserved for others, or simply funny. Deciphering in the company of our consultant, Julien Varlet. "Djokovic is a tool". One of Nick Kyrgios' last tweets did not go unnoticed. On Monday, the Australian virulently criticized the proposals of the world's number one player to relax the full quarantine that 72 players are currently undergoing in Melbourne, as a contact case of individuals carrying the Covid-19 virus. In passing, he called the Serb a... "moron". Of course, this is not a first. The relationship between the two men has been strained for several years, even if it is the younger of the two who likes to mess with the second one, who for the moment is not playing the Australian game. The last spade goes back to last summer, when Kyrgios revealed all the evil he thought about the organisation of the Adria Tour, an exhibition tournament that took place in Croatia and Serbia under the tutelage of Novak Djokovic. Shortly after the latter's positive coronavirus test was announced, he wrote on his favourite social network: "My prayers to all infected players. But there is no longer any point in mentioning my actions as irresponsible or stupid. The Adria Tour surpasses everything. "Before adding a layer two months later during the Masters 1000 in Cincinnati: "He may be undefeated in 2020, but when he was supposed to show leadership and humility, he disappeared. » For Julien Varlet, Kyrgios' tackles are part of his business. "He has the TOP 100 rebel label, so he tries to create a buzz, in one way or another, a bit like a game. But make no mistake, the ATP also benefits from the Australian's subversive side. Proof of this can be seen in Kyrgios breaking rackets in the new advertising campaign ("This is tennis") launched by the institution". In 2019, the whimsical Australian had already thrown several scuds against his favorite target (in front of Rafael Nadal, that is to say!). In May, during the NCR Tennis podcast, he declared: "I have the impression that Djokovic has a sick obsession: to be loved. He wants to be loved like Roger. He wants to be loved so much that I can't stand him. "A first salvo, followed by a new scratch in July. The scene takes place in Atlanta. The Australian bad boy is about to sign an autograph, before changing his rifle. He grabs the pen and erases the inscription "Novak" flocked on the fan's jersey, then slips a little note to his best enemy: "This is what I think of you and your shirt! » Atmosphere. The situation has not improved. Nick Kyrgios continues not to mince his words, as evidenced by his message of Monday, aimed more broadly to all athletes complaining about the conditions in which they must wait for 14 days before being allowed to go out and play tennis. On this point, we can note the consistency of the Canberra native's words since the beginning of the pandemic. In essence, he regularly attacks those who, in his opinion, assess the health crisis too lightly or do not seem to realize the sacrifices made by the common man - and more particularly the Australian population, which has undergone drastic containment measures to control the spread of the virus, and which is not allowed to travel abroad. A strong conviction that first saw him offer his services to the poor inhabitants of his region, last April: "Please, don't go to bed hungry. Don't be ashamed to leave me a message. I would be happy to share what I have. A package of pasta, a piece of bread, some milk. I'll drop it off at your door. "Before deciding simply not to resume his professional activity when the circuit resumes in the summer of 2020, considering that tennis was not in his priorities at the moment. Nevertheless, Nick Kyrgios clearly has a grudge against Novak Djokovic. Proof of this is his latest statement on Wednesday about why the man who has already won 17 Grand Slam titles could not be called the greatest player of all time. No matter how many majors he wins, he's never going to be the greatest to me," said the tweener in an interview with the Herald Sun. I've played him twice, and if he can't beat me, then he can't be the greatest of all time. "In fact, Kyrgios is right and wrong at the same time. The Serbian has never managed to dominate him, and this in the two confrontations that have pitted the two men. Both meetings took place in 2017, in Acapulco and then in Indian Wells, and each time "Kygz" won (7-6, 7-5 and 6-4, 7-6 respectively). But at the time, the Serb was not at 100% physically and would end his season at Wimbledon against Berdych. From there, we can conclude that Novak Djokovic will never be able to claim the status of GOAT (Greatest Of All Time), the argument is a little weak.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8erL_2JYrZg&t=72s

First, because it would mean that beating Kyrgios is part of the criteria to receive this glorious and honorary title. Secondly, because it is difficult to base oneself only on two matches, played 4 years ago, to establish a real hierarchy between the two enemies. Finally, because the king of provocation was not able, himself and on several occasions, to get the better of opponents, some of whom were within his reach, which would have allowed him to face Djokovic again. In detail, an elimination against Marin Cilic at Queen's in 2018, a defeat against Kei Nishikori at Wimbledon in 2018, another against Borna Coric in Miami in 2019, a setback against Jan-Lennard Struff in Madrid in 2019, a disqualification against Capser Ruud in Rome in 2019 and a defeat against Karen Khachanov in Cincinnati, again in 2019. Each time, a duel against Djokovic was promised, but each time, the Australian fell before offering the Serb the opportunity to respond to Kyrgios' attacks with a victory on court...

"It's really not mean and there are no unhealthy ulterior motives"

On this subject, Julien Varlet believes that it is necessary to take a step back. As much as I don't like it when he behaves without respecting his opponents or the public on the court, this kind of message is more of a joke," smiles the former world No. 135. It's really not mean-spirited and there's no malicious intent. I'm sure it doesn't even affect Novak Djokovic and that Nick Kyrgios is just having fun, just to get people talking about him and to get the Serb. And it works, because it's all around, especially in the media, that people talk about it! "Is Kyrgios acting in bad faith? Of course he is. Similarly, his attack on the solutions proposed by "Djoko" to relieve the future participants of the Australian Open stuck in their hotels may seem a bit unfair, when we imagine the world number one speaking as a spokesman for the athletes of the circuit. As a reminder, the former chairman of the ATP Members Council founded a new association with Vasek Pospisil, the Professional Tennis Players Association (PTPA), which aims to represent the interests of players. Among his suggestions, training and fitness equipment in all rooms and food adapted to the diet of a top athlete. On the other hand, one can also understand Nick Kyrgios' exasperation with the timeliness of the Djoker's ideas. This one lives indeed his fourteen weeks in Adelaide, in more favorable conditions, like Rafael Nadal and Dominic Thiem. A favor that had already caused some commotion among the other players. No doubt the Australian, who never minces his words about Djokovic, found the initiative inappropriate. That's the question," said Julien Varlet. Even if Kyrgios is particularly outspoken, his criticism is a reflection of Djokovic's possible double standards. He wants to defend the other players, but he does so when he is not in the same situation. We must not forget that tennis is an individual sport and the Serb, who is eager for records, is undoubtedly satisfied to be in Adelaide to put all the chances on his side to win the first Grand Slam of the year. The claims of "Nole" were not accepted by Craig Tiley, director of the Australian Open, and the public opinion has seen his intentions in a bad light. So much so that the Serbian felt compelled to publish a letter on Wednesday, affirming his sincerity and explaining that he had tried not to be part of the bubble of the wealthy in Adelaide. "My good intentions towards my fellow players have been misinterpreted as selfish, difficult to achieve, and not grateful to the Australian Open organization. This could not be further from the truth. Sometimes, when I see the repercussions of certain things, I tend to wonder whether I should walk away, enjoy my winnings on the circuit, instead of worrying about the difficulties of others. Yet I always choose to do something and make myself useful. For some, Djokovic wanted to take care of his image. The Serb defends himself: "I really care about other players and I understand very well how the world works. (...) I've earned privileges by working hard, and for that very reason, I can't just be a spectator, knowing how much every little bit of attention, help, or encouragement meant to me when I was small and insignificant. "Will this plea convince Nick Kyrgios? Nothing is less certain. We are waiting for his next tweet as an answer. Will he load the mule or let Djokovic down a bit? We have an idea... But the fact that he's leading 2-0 in matches against Djokovic is a godsend for Kyrgios, who's giving himself the right to speak. One could even imagine that he would find it amusing if the duel remained at this point so that he could boast for decades of being undefeated against the current world number one...  

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